Media admits that 10% of those infected with measles were already vaccinated, and that measles vaccines don’t even work after a few years


Though its official failure figure is somewhat questionable, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is finally admitting, at least, that the MMR vaccine for measles, mumps, and rubella doesn’t always work as claimed – and even when it seems like it does, the vaccine’s effectiveness always wanes over time.

Rather than confer permanent immunity inside a person’s body like natural measles infection does, the MMR vaccine provides limited protection at best, it’s now being officially revealed. As this pertains to the ongoing, nationwide measles “outbreak,” as it’s being called, up to 10 percent of cases actually involve people who had previously received the MMR vaccine, the CDC says.

“Adults in the United States who were vaccinated against measles decades ago may need a new dose depending on when they received the shot and their exposure risk, according to public health experts battling the nation’s largest outbreak since the virus was deemed eliminated in 2000,” explains a Reuters report on the situation.

“Up to 10 percent of the 695 confirmed measles cases in the current outbreak occurred in people who received one or two doses of the vaccine, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,” this report adds.

For more news about the failure of government-sanctioned vaccines; the myth of so-called “herd immunity;” and other related ideas, be sure to visit Vaccines.news.

CDC’s admission proves that vaccines don’t work from the perspective of true immunity

By definition, a vaccine is a cocktail of components derived from microorganisms, either dead or alive, combined with various adjuvant chemicals that, when injected into the body, is supposed to produce or artificially increase immunity to a particular disease.

Immunity, definitionally speaking, means that the body is “able to resist a particular disease especially through preventing development of a pathogenic microorganism or by counteracting the effects of its products.”

Putting two and two together, a vaccine is thus supposed to provide lasting protection against disease – something we now know, from the horse’s (CDC’s) own mouth, doesn’t happen when a person receives an MMR vaccine.

At best, MMR might provide temporary protection against disease – though, even this is now being challenged by the CDC, which now admits that measles outbreaks occur “when a large number of individuals, even those who have been vaccinated, are exposed to the measles.”

Rather than finally just relent to the fact that MMR vaccines are utterly useless, however, the CDC and other health authorities are doubling down on the claim that simply getting lots of MMR vaccines over and over again is still the best way to avoid measles.

We’ll say it as many times as we need to: Measles is NO BIG DEAL

Despite the fact that measles remains a mostly harmless disease, no worse than the chickenpox, mainstream health authorities continue to fuel measles hysteria – an obvious ploy to sell more MMR vaccines.

But it can’t be repeated enough that contracting the measles is no big deal. In fact, it’s actually a good thing, especially for young children, because once they recover they will have protection against measles for life – no vaccines necessary!

“Measles is usually a mild, self-limiting childhood illness,” explains Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Chairman of the Board at Children’s Health Defense (CHD), in an article entitled, “A Dozen Facts About Measles That You Won’t Learn From MSPharmedia.”

“Unlike Merck’s MMR vaccine, wild measles infection confers lifetime immunity from measles. Having measles in childhood may also reduce the risk of atopic disease, heart disease, Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas and some other cancers,” he adds.

Be sure to read Kennedy’s full article at this link and check MeaslesNews.com for news about the measles.

Sources for this article include:

News.Trust.org

Merriam-Webster.com

Merriam-Webster.com

NaturalNews.com

ChildrensHealthDefense.org

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